Vous Les Essayez Meaning

The French words encore and toujours have a few different meanings, but they share one in common: "still." Because of this shared meaning, it’s easy to confuse these two very common words. Let’s take an in-depth look at both of them to see where they merge and diverge. 

In general, when you're using "still" in the sense of continuity (i.e. "to still be doing something"), encore and toujours are interchangeable. For example, "he is still on the phone" could be both il est encore au téléphone and il est toujours au téléphone

Besides "still," the basic meanings of encore and toujours are: 

encore: more/another, again, yet

toujours: always, anyway/anyhow

Let’s start with encore. In their video for "La place des anges" (The Angels’ Place), the Belgian band Yaaz manages to fit two of encore’s meanings into one sad little line: 

Elle a encore peur, elle a encore pleuré

She is still afraid, she has cried again

Cap. 13, Yaaz: La place des anges

Hopefully she’ll be feeling better soon! On a different note, encore can also mean "another" or "more" (as in "one more," "two more," etc.), as the band Dahlia uses it in this song lyric: 

Encore une fois, encore une autre, et encore une voix, encore un manque

Onemore time, another one, and onemore voice, another lack

Cap. 25, Dahlia: Contre courant 

So now do you see why a band’s return to the stage is called an "encore"? It’s because the audience wants to see them once again! 

Along these same lines, encore + a noun usually means "more of something," like food at the dinner table:

Vous voulez encore du pain?

Do you want some more bread? 

Encore can also mean "yet," usually in the sense of "not yet" (pasencore): 

Donc elle est pas encore prête pour la ferme. 

So it’s not ready for the farm yet

Cap. 8, Agriculture verticale: TerraSphere

Now let’s explore toujours. Daniel Benchimol uses it as "still" when orienting us on his tour of the Normandy town of Honfleur: 

Toujours à Honfleur, nous sommes maintenant sur la place Sainte-Catherine.

Still in Honfleur, we are now in Sainte-Catherine Square.

Cap. 17, Voyage en France: La Normandie - Honfleur

And Fred uses it as "always" to describe the perpetually perfect weather in Miami: 

Il fait toujours chaud, toujours beau, toujours agréable.

It’s always warm, always nice, always pleasant.

Cap. 34, Fred et Miami Catamarans: Fred et sa vie à Miami

You can remember this meaning by breaking the word down: toujours is a combination of the words tous (all) and jours (days), so it literally means "all days."

The final meaning of toujours is "anyway":

Je ne vais probablement pas gagner à la loterie, mais je vais toujours essayer. 

I probably won’t win the lottery, but I’m going to try anyway

Since both of these words have quite a few meanings, context is key when determining which one they’re referring to. So if you receive a text message after a first date that reads, Tu as toujours envie de me voir?, don't freak out! Your potential love interest isn't asking you if you always feel like seeing him or her, but rather if you still feel like seeing him or her. You're just being asked out on a second date! Context is also important when the two words are used in the same sentence:

Il y a encore autre chose que nous t'avons toujours caché!

There is still another thing that we've always hidden from you!

Cap. 6, Les zooriginaux: 3 Qui suis-je? - Part 1 

We could rehash this subject encore et toujours (again and again), but maybe it’s best for you to explore these words on your own by looking out for them in the Yabla French videos. They should pop up quite often! 

Vocabulary

es·say

(ĕs′ā′, ĕ-sā′)
n.
1. (ĕs′ā′)

a. A short literary composition on a single subject, usually presenting the personal view of the author.

b. Something resembling such a composition: a photojournalistic essay.

2. A testing or trial of the value or nature of a thing: an essay of the students' capabilities.

3. An initial attempt or endeavor, especially a tentative attempt.

tr.v.(ĕ-sā′, ĕs′ā′)es·sayed, es·say·ing, es·says

1. To make an attempt at; try.

2. To subject to a test.


[French essai, trial, attempt, from Old French, from essayer, to attempt, from Vulgar Latin *exagiāre, to weigh out, from Late Latin exagium, a weighing : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots. V., from Middle English assaien, from Old French assaer, assaier, variant of essayer.]


es·say′er n.

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