Zhu Hua Intercultural Communication Essay

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  • Intercultural Communication

    Intercultural Communication (SML2246)

    StaffProfessor Sonia Cunico - Convenor
    Credit Value15
    ECTS Value7.5
    NQF Level5
    Pre-requisites
    Co-requisites
    Duration of Module Term 2: 11 weeks;

    Module aims

    In a multilingual and multicultural world, the ability to understand the nature of culture/s and the ability to respond appropriately to unfamiliar cultural practices is essential. This module aims to develop a greater sensitivity to cultural and linguistic diversity through engagement with critical concepts such as culture, identity, othering, mis/communication in a range of different contexts and through different media. The module adopts an interdisciplinary approach and aims to develop a familiarity with different analytical tools and approaches, and the ability to design and develop an individual research project.

    ILO: Module-specific skills

    • 1. Demonstrate understanding of the key theoretical notions and concepts in Intercultural Communication Theory as well as their relevance in multilingual and multicultural contexts.
    • 2. Demonstrate the development of your Intercultural Competence through the analysis of data which illustrate instances of cultural diversity and/or mis/understanding.

    ILO: Discipline-specific skills

    • 3. Recognise, describe, and evaluate, under guidance from the module tutor/s, a variety of critical responses to case studies and sources.
    • 4. Demonstrate the development of ethnographic skills within a structured framework.
    • 5. Recognise and understand the role of language/s as a key locus of personal and sociocultural identity as well as of Intercultural mis/understanding.
    • 6. Demonstrate familiarity and ability to draw on a range of research literature
    • 7. Demonstrate ability to engage with a variety of research approaches, including ethnography of communication, contrastive pragmatics, and discourse analysis.

    ILO: Personal and key skills

    • 8. Develop intercultural awareness and competence based on engagement with a variety of readings and case studies
    • 9. Undertake an independent research project, which involves data collection and use of appropriate analytical frameworks.

    Syllabus plan

    • What is Communication? Models of communication, identity, and ‘othering’
    • Context and Culture – The ethnography of communication
    • Language in Interaction: The structuring of talk as a cultural phenomenon
    • Language in Interaction: How do I say what I mean? And Do I really mean what I say?
    • Cross-Cultural Pragmatics or When people mean different things by what they say
    • Intercultural Communication and Miscommunication
    • Co-construction and resistance of cultural identity and communities

    Learning activities and teaching methods (given in hours of study time)

    Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
    151350

    Details of learning activities and teaching methods

    CategoryHours of study timeDescription
    Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities1511 x 1.5 hr One-hour lectures and seminars
    Office Hour1Available for consultation re project
    Guided Independent Study135Private study and seminar preparation

    Formative assessment

    Form of assessmentSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
    Project proposal written in English500 words1-9Written and/or verbal

    Summative assessment (% of credit)

    CourseworkWritten examsPractical exams
    10000

    Details of summative assessment

    Form of assessment% of creditSize of the assessment (eg length / duration)ILOs assessedFeedback method
    Project written in English1002500 word project in English1-9written and oral
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0

    Details of re-assessment (where required by referral or deferral)

    Original form of assessmentForm of re-assessmentILOs re-assessedTimescale for re-assessment
    ProjectProject1-9Referral/deferral period

    Re-assessment notes

    Successful referred students will receive the maximum achievable mark of 40 for their essay. Successful deferred students will have their re-assessment treated as a first attempt, thus the full range of marks will be available.

    Indicative learning resources - Basic reading

    Jackson, J. (2014) Introducing Language and Intercultural Communication,London: Routledge. Available online via MyiLibrary

    Liu, S., Volcic, Z., and Gallois, C. (2014) Introducing Intercultural     Communication, London: Sage. Available from the University bookshop

    Jandt, Fred E. (2015) An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community. SAGE

    Piller, I. (2011) Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction Edinburgh University Press

    Holliday, A, Hyde, A, and Kullman, J. ·(2010) Intercultural Communication: An Advanced Resource Book for Students. Routledge 

    Hua, Zhu (2013) Exploring Intercultural Communication: Language in Action (Routledge Introductions to Applied Linguistics). Routledge

    Module has an active ELE page?

    No

    Available as distance learning?

    No

    Origin date

    February 2015

    Last revision date

    01/02/2017

    Key words search

    Intercultural competence, identity, pragmatics, miscommunication

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